Butterfly on lilacBloom Blog      

Welcome to our wildflower viewing reports.


Please send us your wildflower photos and reports. Thank you.


June 9, 2015
Welcome back! It's been several days since we've had wildflower photos come in. Please, if you have any to share, send them on to us at the link above.

Today Ray Velasquez checked in again - he's been out all around the Quincy area and shared several really nice photos with us. Thanks, Ray! Ray writes:

Blue eyed grassI finally had some time to get out and shoot a few new blooms.The first is Blue-Eyed Grass shot at Butterfly Valley.



Tiger lilyThe second is Tiger Lily, one of my favorite wildflowers! This one bloomed on Blackhawk Road heading toward Butterfly Valley, about a mile past where the asphalt turns into dirt, but I also saw one at Snake Lake that has yet to bloom.



Daisy fleabaneHere is a Daisy Fleabane, which bloomed near the high school.



ColumbineI also found Columbine at Snake Lake:









Sierra clarkiaSierra Clarkia from Spanish Creek, and blooming just about everywhere else.











May 24, 2015
Snow PlantToday we have a nice shot of a Snow Plant near Antelope Lake in beautiful Indian Valley. Thanks so much to Janice Castillo for sharing.







May 22, 2015
We have two reports with photos today. The first, from our friend Joe Willis, gives us a look toward wildflowers in June. And the second, shared by the Feather River Land Trust is a great shot of the beautiful Sierra Valley in eastern Plumas County.

Spotted CoralrootJoe writes: Here's the beautiful Spotted Coralroot, a member of the orchid family.  It was already spotted when I got there, of course, but I spotted it this afternoon in the forest adjacent to the FRC campus.  I believe the current rainy spell will produce a great June for wildflower watching.



Camas LilyAnd the Feather River Land Trust shared this beautiful Camas Lily with rain clouds in the background in the Sierra Valley.














May 15, 2015
Here are two more photos from Ray Velasquez. He reports he found these Mountain Lady Slippers near Spanish Creek. Thanks for sharing, Ray.

Lady SlipperLady Slipper



May 13, 2015
Please join us in welcoming a new resident and new Bloom Blog contributor, Ray Velasquez, to our page. Ray reported that these photos were all taken around the general Quincy area over the past few days.

dogwoodHartweg's IrisPitcher plantFrom Butterfly Valley - Dogwood, Pitcher Plant and  Hartweg's Iris.

violetsSpotted  coral rootViolets and Spotted Coral Root, taken off Blackhawk Road.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Showy PhloxLupineShowy Phlox and Lupine among clover, taken off Mount Hough Road.









Red cloverAnd beautiful Red Clover, which Ray found along Chandler Road.











May 11, 2015
Joe Willis
was busy over the weekend. He sent this report and his usual excellent photos. To see even more of Joe's report and photography, please visit his blog.

Here's what I'm seeing at roadsides and slightly into the woods around American Valley. 

The Mountain Lady Slippers have just started to bloom at my favorite site on the Oakland Camp Road just a couple hundred yards past the bridge over Spanish Creek. 

The rest of these photos were taken in that vicinity.  To me, even the most beautiful blooming wildflower is like an unfinished story unless its pollinators are included in the picture.  They come to the flower for a meal, or as a staging area for mating, but the end result is pollination.

 Mountain Lady Slipper
Mountain Lady Slipper
 Orchard Morning Glory
Orchard Morning Glory
 Interior Wild Rose
Interior Wild Rose
 Mules Ear
Mule's Ears
 Checker Bloom
Checker Bloom
Oc-eye Daisy
Ox-eye Daisy
 



May 5, 2015

We're so happy to have some new photos to share today. Mike Nellor took a little hike around Butterfly Valley yesterday. He reports "The Butterfly loop is really starting to show it's stuff!! Azalia, iris, dogwood, Mariposa lilly, and of course pitcher plants.

 Cobra Plant  Cobra Plants
 Lily  Butterfly Valley
 Forest Serv Sign




April 29, 2015
It's been a few days since we've received reports and photos. If you have any you'd like to share please click the link above and send them on to us. We're always happy to post new reports.


Today we received this report and photos from Joe Willis. And we also received several photos from Mike Nellor, which we'll be posting later on. Here's Joe's report:

This morning, mostly in the shade, I walked from my car to my office at FRC, and stopped frequently to photograph mostly tiny things that go unnoticed most of the time.  They are tiny, but also hidden by grass, shade, and simply the busyness of trying to get to work.  I hope my pausing to photograph these things leads more people to slow down and take a look. 

Lemmon's Wild GingerLemon's Wild GingerThe Lemmon's Wild Ginger blossoms are always hidden by their own leaves, so one has to know they're there in order to feel like looking.  They are in the same family as the more dramatic Dutchman's Pipevine. 

 

 

 

 

Woodland Star FlowerThe Woodland Star Flower is in the same family as the better-known Indian Rhubarb or Umbrella Plant. 

 

Western Dog VioletThe Western Dog Violet is our only local, native violet that's actually violet in color.  Most of our local species of violets are yellow. 

 

 

 

Blue Eyed MaryThe Blue-eyed Mary is a truly tiny flower.  the close-up needed and the shade made it difficult for me to get a really sharp image.  It's a truly beautiful little flower, worth the trouble of soiling one's pants to get down on the ground. 

 

 

 

 

 

HorsetailThe Horsetails, lining the drainage ditch, were particularly pretty this morning as every branch was tipped by drops of dew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


April 14, 2015

A note to our readers: Be sure to check out Joe Willis's blog. There is tons more information there. Did you know Joe is available to lead group hikes to view nature? He is!

Here is more of Joe's report from the weekend:
Snow PlantWe started hiking from the Southpark Trailhead for the first time, and found a few surprises. There was very little underbrush among the widely spaced young pines and firs, but we were started to see a bright red glow some 50 feet off the trail.

Snow PlantTurned out to be a couple of patches of Snow Plant. At 3,500', that's the lowest elevation that I've ever encountered them.







Popcorn flowerI don't know how I spotted the little white flowers, all of 1/4" in diameter on stems only 4 or 5" tall.


Popcorn flowerI think it's either popcorn Flower or White Stickseed. Definitely something in the borage family, the family that includes Forget-me-nots.







Paianted lady butterflyThe first butterfly activity in my yard this season was several Painted Ladies that discovered my best-in-the-neighborhood crop of Dandelions. We only hiked as far as the Monument Peak traihead, but saw lots of Henderson's Shooting Star, Death Camas, and Dusky Horkelia, all of which have been pictured here earlier.








April 8, 2015
Joe Willis was out and about again over the weekend - here's his report:
Seen just north of Oakland Camp on dirt road to Gilson Creek. This was Saturday, before the dusting of snow. This moisture should bring out a few more species soon.
So far, in response to warmth and drought, I'm seeing some species blooming before their stems and leaves have fully matured. In this batch of photos it's particularly true of the Phlox and the Umbrella Plant (formerly known as Indian Rhubarb). Maybe the current rainy spell will cause some of these to fatten up.

 Arrowleaf Balsamroot
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
 Pine Violet
Pine Violet
Showy Phlox
Showy Phlox
 California Buttercup
California Buttercup
Umbrella Plant
Umbrella Plant



April 3, 2015

We;re happy to share another report from Joe Willis:

On April Fool's Day I found two more species of wildflowers blooming. 

ToothwortThe Stout-beaked Toothwort, a member of the mustard family, is blooming near the spot where Butterfly Creek and Butterfly Valley Road meet Highway 70.  It is likely to be blooming in similar habitats such as the Keddie Cascades Trail. 



Wild GingerLemmon's Wild Ginger has started to bloom in shady spots by flowing water on the Feather River College campus.









March 30, 2015

Joe Willis did make it out to Oakland Camp over the weekend. Here's his report.....

Wildflowers are beginning to "pop" around Oakland Camp, but the signs of drought are more obvious than ever and I don't expect the wildflower season to last very long or to be as intense as in normal years. I saw no Indian Rhubarb starts, for instance, and most of the mid-stream clumps of sedge and grasses they grow from were high and dry.

What I have called "another mustard" is in the same family, the mustard family, as the rock cress and may well be in the same genus.  I'm not sure.  What I call "flying flowers" because of their bright colors are the Common Merganser.  There are new leaves of many other species appearing, but we're going to need some rain if many of them get to mature and bloom.

 Mustard
Another Mustard
Elegant Rock Cress
Elegant Rock Cress
Chickweed
Checkweed
Red Larkspur
Red Larkspur
Buttercup
Buttercup and beetle
Bigleaf Maple
Bigleaf Maple
Mergansers
Flying Flowers


March 28, 2015
Today's report from Joe Willis gives a summary of his recent findings around Quincy.

Joe's report: "Here are a few photos from the last few days of flowers growing around Quincy. Mostly at the college and nearby. Today I'm going to the Oakland Camp area again and hiking along the west side of Spanish Creek. Will report later today on my findings. The Dutchman's Pipevine shown here is growing in a secret spot in downtown Quincy."

Dutchman's Pipevine
Dutchman's Pipevine
 Henbit
Henbit
 Forsythia
Forsythia
 Gooseberry
Gooseberry
 Oregon Grape
Oregon Grape
 Meadow Foam
Meadow Foam

 


March 24, 2015

 

We have a new report today from Joe Willis. Very interesting information, not only on wildflowers, but on hiking trails around Quincy. Joe writes:
What used to be called the Keddie Cascades Trail, together with the area's many deer paths, has undergone a lot of revision recently, and there are now signs and maps galore. On Sunday, we began our hike at a trail head by the bridge over Spanish Creek on the Oakland Camp Road. It's across the road from the popular swimming hole. We started off on what is called the Spanish Traverse. If we had stayed on this trail, I think we would have come out in the vicinity of the Keddie Cascades. But, we opted to head further up hill by taking what was called the Spanish Ridge loop.

Altogether we hiked close to five miles and found a surprising number of spring wildflowers blooming. There's one purple species I haven't yet identified, but it looks like it might be a Penstemon. Some of them were so fleshy and beautiful, they looked like they could have come as potted plants in a nursery, despite the very dry soil, or even apparent lack of soil. It's obvious the area has been logged, probably several times, and much of it has inadequate soil fro growing trees. This, Manzanita, Black Oak, Buck Brush, and Silk Tassel Bush dominate the drier hills. At the highest point on the ridge trail there were abundant patches of Death Camas ( a lily) and Shooting Star. These areas were relatively flat and had a fair amount of soil consisting mostly of pine needles. We saw the early leaves of lots of species that haven't bloomed yet and this promises an interesting spring. Among those is the Heart-leaf Milkweed pictured here. There were also lots of Lupine, Horkelia, Fennel, Pennyroyal, and various lilies.

 Blue-eyed Mary
Blue-eyed Mary
Heart-leaf-Milkwood
Heart-leaf-Milkweed
Pine Violet
Pine Violet
 Pine Violet
Pine Violet
Rock Garden
Rock Garden
 Shelton's Violet
Shelton's Violet
 Shooting Star
Shooting Star
 Shooting Star
Shooting Star



March 23, 2015
As promised, Joe Willis sent us six more photos from his trip to Table Mountain last week. He sent this report with his photos, and another promise of more to come! Here's his report:
My first submissions from Table Mountain were of the more plentiful wildflowers that everyone who hikes there sees. Today I'm sending photos of some that many people never see. They are either relatively uncommon or are good at hiding in crevices and other shady places. All but the Manroot can be found as high as the Quincy elevation a month or so later than at Table Mountain.
Some spring wildflowers are starting to appear around Quincy, so I'll send some photos I took yesterday around Oakland Camp.

 Bird's-Foot Fern
Bird's-foot Fern
California Manroot
California Manroot
 Bush Lupine
Bush Lupine
Mountain Jewelflower
Mountain Jewelflower
 Wild Hyacinth
Wild Hyacinth
Three-parted Woodland Star
Three-parted Woodland Star




March 16, 2015

Intrepid reporter and photographer Joe Willis really outdid himself over the weekend. He and his son ventured down to Table Mountain, just outside Oroville, and sent this report and wonderful photos:
We drove down Feather River Canyon early Saturday morning and saw several species of wildflowers blooming: Red Larkspur, Wall Flower, Bush Monkeyflower, Redbud, and Waterfall Buttercup. We didn't stop because we had a long hike planned for Table Mountain. It turned out to be a lot longer than we planned because we got a bit lost. Probably covered at least 15 miles.

The effects of drought years were apparent, but even a below-average year on Table Mountain is still spectacular. The warm and partly cloudy day offered perfect lighting for flower photography. Here's a baker's dozen from our trip. I'll send another 7 or 8 soon.

There were lots of people - some arriving by tour bus! Seeing that was a first for me! Lots of bicycles, cars, and possible some walked from nearby homes. Lots of dogs, kites, and portable musical devices near the parking lot. But after hiking just a short distance we found more flowers than people and it was quite pleasant. My memory card was filled before the end of our hike so I missed getting photos of some great flowers like Fairy Lanterns, Tidy Tips, and various species of Phacelia and Larkspur.

Some some fine waterfalls, too, but got confused and never found our main objective, Phantom Falls. We did find another impressive waterfall that looked like a slightly smaller version of Phantom Falls, complete with a cave behind the cascade and lots of Dippers visiting. I'm going to try to figure out where we went by studying Google Earth. Then maybe I'll find out which waterfall we visited. Remember, "not all who wander are lost."

 
Table Mountain Icons
 
Table Mountain Meadowfoam
 
Sky Lupine

Seep Monkeyflower
 
Purple Owl's Clover
 
Fiddleneck

Kellogg's Monkeyflower
 
Bird's Eye Gilia

Dutchman's Pipe

Douglas Violet
 
Bitterroot
 
California Newt

Goldfields and friends